News

Webinar Invitation: Join us for "Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers"April 16, 2014 9:36


Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers
Join us for a Webinar on April 30

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/832319351
"Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers" is a free three-part webinar series designed to inform interested persons about strategies to ensure the future health of Texas' rivers, bays and estuaries...


Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers

Join us for a Webinar on April 30


Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/832319351

"Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers" is a free three-part webinar series designed to inform interested persons about strategies to ensure the future health of Texas' rivers, bays and estuaries.

Drawing on practical experience from here in Texas and around the world, speakers will discuss innovative approaches for ensuring that rivers, bays and estuaries continue to get the flow needed to protect water quality and support healthy fish and wildlife populations. Without affirmative strategies to protect flows, the natural heritage embodied in Texas' rivers, bays and estuaries is at risk.

The first webinar will provide an international perspective from Brian Richter on the state of rivers and what is being done to protect and/or restore these vital resources.  Texas water policy experts Myron Hess and Andy Sansom will highlight why this issue is important in Texas, what is at stake, and what types of approaches might be taken to keep Texas rivers flowing all the water to the coast.  

Presenters:
Myron Hess, National Wildlife Federation
Brian Richter, The Nature Conservancy
Andy Sansom, The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment

This webinar series is presented by the Sierra Club - Lone Star Chapter, National Wildlife Federation and The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment.
Title: Keeping Rivers Flowing: Innovative Strategies to Protect and Restore Rivers
Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.
System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer

Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet


Posted: April 16, 2014 9:36   Go to blog
Grand Opening of Jacob's Well Natural Area, Saturday, May 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 15, 2014 16:26
Hays County Courthouse, San Marcos, TX – Jacob’s Well Natural Area, the first Hays County-owned nature preserve, will celebrate its grand opening Saturday, May 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 221 Woodacre Drive, Wimberley. The public is invited to save the date -- special events, tours and family fun are being planned.
Jacob’s Well is a perpetual artesian spring and is the main source for Cypress Creek, which forms the Blue Hole swimming area downstream and then flows through Wimberley into the Blanco River...
Hays County Courthouse, San Marcos, TX – Jacob’s Well Natural Area, the first Hays County-owned nature preserve, will celebrate its grand opening Saturday, May 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 221 Woodacre Drive, Wimberley. The public is invited to save the date -- special events, tours and family fun are being planned.

Jacob’s Well is a perpetual artesian spring and is the main source for Cypress Creek, which forms the Blue Hole swimming area downstream and then flows through Wimberley into the Blanco River. The County purchased the property in 2010 with voter-approved park bond funds to preserve the natural area and protect it from future development. Now, the public is invited to experience this natural wonder and learn more about the importance of preserving it for future generations.
“This preserve is a good investment by the taxpayers of Hays County,” said Precinct 3 Commissioner Will Conley. “It’s a wonderful recreational area for families to enjoy some of our natural assets. It serves as an educational facility for current and future generations to learn about the Wimberley Valley ecosystem and the importance of our natural resources. And, it helps our business climate by encouraging tourism which is our area’s largest economic asset.”
The County has completed several restoration projects on the 81.5-acre preserve. In May 2013 the former Woodcreek North Property Owners Association building and eight condo units were demolished and removed from the floodplain, a new cedar post fence installed at the main entrance and remnants – asphalt streets, utilities and concrete pads – of a mobile home park were removed.
A new interpretive garden at the Nature Center has been planted with the help of Hays County Master Naturalists, who volunteer their time to educate the public through free tours offered each Saturday at 10 a.m. The Nature Center building is being updated to provide a more enjoyable meeting space. Trails have been added to allow the public access to 40-plus acres in the upland areas for additional recreational activities such as hiking, birding and geocaching.
The Natural Area is open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, free of charge. Come out, learn more and enjoy the preserve!
For information about grand opening events or the Natural Area, please contact the Hays County Parks Department at 512-847-2140 or look for updates on www.co.hays.tx.us.
Posted: April 15, 2014 16:26   Go to blog
Invitation to the Texas Desal 2014 Best Practices & Emerging TechnologyApril 11, 2014 11:24

SAVE THE DATE. Or better yet, register now!

Please join us for the 2nd annual Texas Desalination Association conference as we continue to move desal forward as a water supply solution for today -- and for the future of Texas.

WHEN: Thursday, September 11, 2014 - Friday, September 12, 2014
WHERE: Hilton Austin Airport
WHAT: View Event Summary
HOW MUCH: View Event Fees
BE A SPONSOR: View Sponsor Info or Contact WaterPR.

Please respond by clicking one of the options below:YES, I want to register for TexasDesal2014...

SAVE THE DATE. Or better yet, register now!

Please join us for the 2nd annual Texas Desalination Association conference as we continue to move desal forward as a water supply solution for today -- and for the future of Texas.

WHEN: Thursday, September 11, 2014 - Friday, September 12, 2014
WHERE: Hilton Austin Airport
WHAT: View Event Summary
HOW MUCH: View Event Fees
BE A SPONSOR: View Sponsor Info or Contact WaterPR.

Please respond by clicking one of the options below:
Texas Desal 2014 is an annual conference event of the
Texas Desalination Association.
Produced by WaterPR
Invitation Bottom Banner
Posted: April 11, 2014 11:24   Go to blog
It's not too late to help GEAA make our match April 11, 2014 11:17




Dear GEAA members and friends,

Thank you so much to those of you who have responded so generously to this year’s membership renewal.  As of today, we are $7,500 short of realizing the full matching funds offered by the S/M Hixon Family Foundation.  If you have yet to renew your membership, please do so today.  All donations will be matched, and donations of $200 or more will be matched 2:1...




Dear GEAA members and friends,

Thank you so much to those of you who have responded so generously to this year’s membership renewal.  As of today, we are $7,500 short of realizing the full matching funds offered by the S/M Hixon Family Foundation.  If you have yet to renew your membership, please do so today.  All donations will be matched, and donations of $200 or more will be matched 2:1.  What a deal!  You can donate on-line here, or send your donation to GEAA at PO Box 15618, San Antonio, Texas 78212.

 
Here are a couple of items that you might find interesting:

The Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy wants your congregation to join Water Leadership for Texas: Be a Water Captain! 
Water Captains are local members of the faith community who partner with state and local leaders to make sure the Texas water planning process works for everyone. Register to attend the Water Captains Leadership Conference in Austin June 29-30, 2014 - Join Water Captains from around the state to learn about water planning from state leaders and water experts. Local Presentations - Host presentations for your congregation or group by Water Captains staff members Regional Workshops - Attend a one-day intensive on water issues in your area and meet local water leaders Citizen's Guide - Serve on a team from your region and help "write the book" on water planning for the rest of us!  Read more here.
And, if you are concerned about how Proposition 6/SWIFT Funds are to be allocated, consider attending the TWDB Board meetings to be held April 17 in Austin at the Texas State Capitol
The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) will hold two Board meetings to discuss innovative water solutions for Texas and financial assistance for water projects.  The two meetings will be held in Austin at the Texas State Capitol Building, 1100 Congress Avenue, Room E2.030, on April 17, 2014, at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.  
The morning session will include presentations and discussions from external experts on innovative water solutions to conserve and manage existing water supplies in Texas, as well as ideas on developing new supplies for Texas.
The TWDB afternoon agenda will include consideration of financial assistance for water projects around Texas, as well as briefings and discussions on SWIFT rule development and drought conditions.
The public and interested stakeholders are encouraged to attend and provide public comment at both meetings.
Hope you are enjoying this lovely spring day.
Annalisa Peace, Executive Director, Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance
You can always keep up with interesting water news on GEAA's Face Book page
and, you can mail contributions to support GEAA to PO Box 15618, San Antonio, Texas 78212
 
Posted: April 11, 2014 11:17   Go to blog
4/12 One Village Service Day: Bouldin Creek CleanupApril 08, 2014 11:46
April One Village Service Day

When: Saturday, April 12, 11am-3pm
Where: Meet in park across from the Amala Foundation 1006 S. 8th St. Austin, TX 78704  Dear Community – youth, parents, friends, and volunteers,

For our next Service Day, One Village will be turning it's attention to serving the Amala Foundation's backyard.  One Village will be partnering with the Bouldin Creek Neighborhood Association, and Keep Austin Beautiful to help clean up Bouldin Creek...
amala foundation
April One Village Service Day

When: Saturday, April 12, 11am-3pm
Where: Meet in park across from the Amala Foundation 1006 S. 8th St. Austin, TX 78704 
Dear Community – yGYPSouth, parents, friends, and volunteers,

For our next Service Day, One Village will be turning it's attention to serving the Amala Foundation's backyard.  One Village will be partnering with the Bouldin Creek Neighborhood Association, and Keep Austin Beautiful to help clean up Bouldin Creek.
If you are able to join us, please RSVP on our Facebook event page.  

Here is our schedule for the day:
  • 11am: Meet in the park across from Amala**
  • 11:15-12:30pm: Bouldin Creek Cleanup
  • 12:30pm: Walk to Butler Park
  • 1-2:30pm: Lunch and Village Talking Circle
  • 3pm: End of the day in park across from Amala.
**Please note: the Amala Foundation will be closed for a wedding.

This is a community event.  All are welcome.  Please feel free to bring friends and family.
Youth Transportation:
  • We are in need of volunteers willing to help transport youth from their homes to the Service Day.
  • If you are able to support One Village in this way, please email eva@amalafoundation.org.
 
If you have any other questions, please contact EvaClaire at eva@amalafoundation.org, and (512)565-6187.

We hope to see you there!

With Gratitude,
Amala Foundation
*As a reminder, Gmail users, you may need to "drag" our emails from your Promotions folder and "drop" them into your Primary folder so you ensure you receive them.

1006 S. 8th Street
Austin, TX 78704
512.476.8884

www.amalafoundation.org
We will never share, rent or sell your personal information to third parties.
Please add eva@amalafoundation.org to your address book to ensure future email deliveries.

Amala Foundation: 1006 South 8th Street, Austin, Texas 78704

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Posted: April 08, 2014 11:46   Go to blog
Certified Interpretive Guide Training Workshop - begins April 28thApril 04, 2014 13:03
Do you want to create meaningful experiences and memories that last a lifetime?

The Hill Country Alliance (HCA) and Travis Audubon are offering an Interpretation class that will help
you connect the minds and hearts of your audience to the beauty of nature and the mysteries of
history.

The more hearts we touch, the more minds we inspire, the better the future for our Hill Country...
Do you want to create meaningful experiences and memories that last a lifetime?

The Hill Country Alliance (HCA) and Travis Audubon are offering an Interpretation class that will help
you connect the minds and hearts of your audience to the beauty of nature and the mysteries of
history.

The more hearts we touch, the more minds we inspire,
the better the future for our Hill Country.

Certified Interpretive Guide Training Workshop #4
 Monday and Tuesday, April 28 & 29, 2014 and 
Monday and Tuesday, May 5 & 6, 2014
at a Private ranch near Austin, TX
Download Flyer

Hill Country Alliance, in partnership with the National Association for
Interpretation
(NAI), is offering a course for anyone who delivers messages about natural,
cultural or historic sites or who would generally like to more effectively connect with
audiences of any size about the importance of protecting the Hill Country.

This 32-hour class will teach you to:
- Emotionally connect the audience with the presentation topic.
- Use recent research on social behavior and learning.
- Tailor programs for diverse audiences and various learning styles.
- Improve communication and presentation skills.
- Design and practice a full presentation by the end of the course.

Instructor:
Clark Hancock, Certified Interpretive Trainer: clktemhan@me.com or call (512) 507-1627.

Cost:
Course only: $245 or Course with NAI Certification: $375
Fees include materials

Scholarships may be considered on request. This is a small class, only 12 seats
are available. Please email christy@hillcountryalliance.org for more information
and to begin registration.
Posted: April 04, 2014 13:03   Go to blog
CARDtalk: CAMPO Open House April 2, 2014 March 27, 2014 9:46
You can help shape the future of the transportation systems in Hays County and our metropolitan area by attending an open house from 5:30-8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 2nd at the San Marcos Activity Center, 501 E Hopkins St. Please see the Open House announcement below. The plans developed by CAMPO (Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization) set the strategy for future roadways and public transportation systems that use federal funds - almost all of the larger projects.  Your input into this planning process is vital to the future of our region.  Please attend and participate...
You can help shape the future of the transportation systems in Hays County and our metropolitan area by attending an open house from 5:30-8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 2nd at the San Marcos Activity Center, 501 E Hopkins St. Please see the Open House announcement below. The plans developed by CAMPO (Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization) set the strategy for future roadways and public transportation systems that use federal funds - almost all of the larger projects.  Your input into this planning process is vital to the future of our region.  Please attend and participate.

For information on CARD's support of the Hays County Transportation Growth Corridor Plan, see the Transportation page on our website.
CARD Steering Committee



Posted: March 27, 2014 9:46   Go to blog
AC Daily: Beck signs on for Austin City Limits April tapingMarch 25, 2014 13:56
March 25, 2014 Beck Confirms for 'Austin City Limits' Taping Repping his latest album, Morning Phase, Beck has signed on for an April 27 taping at the Moody, joining a 40th season lineup that already includes Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, Eric Church, and Thao & the Get Down Stay Down...
March 25, 2014
The Austin Chronicle
Beck Confirms for 'Austin City Limits' Taping
Repping his latest album, Morning Phase, Beck has signed on for an April 27 taping at the Moody, joining a 40th season lineup that already includes Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, Eric Church, and Thao & the Get Down Stay Down.
Foodways Texas Looks at Agriculture Through Different Lenses
College Station played host to Foodways Texas' fourth annual symposium for a weekend that laid bare the embarrassment of Texas riches in terms of both ingredients and culinary talent.
Enviro Advocates Honored
The Save Barton Creek Association handed out awards Monday night to Austin staff members, a council member, a hydrologist, an activist researcher, and the founders of a certain alternative weekly for their contributions to environmental protection.
Today's Events Photo by Travis Shinn / Courtesy of benatargiraldo.com
Posted: March 25, 2014 13:56   Go to blog
HELP PROTECT JACOB'S WELL, TWO DAYS LEFT TO AMPLIFY OUR WATER!March 18, 2014 13:37
 
KEEP OUR SPRINGS, CREEKS AND RIVERS CLEAN,CLEAR AND FLOWING JUMP IN AND SCHEDULE YOUR GIFT NOW! 
We are thrilled to announce our participation in  I Live Here I Give Here Amplify Austin. Amplify Austin is a 24-hour giving day from 6pm Thursday, March 20, to 6pm Friday, March 21, 2014, to Central Texas nonprofits.

AmplifyATX...
 
We are thrilled to announce our participation in  I Live Here I Give Here Amplify Austin. Amplify Austin is a 24-hour giving day from 6pm Thursday, March 20, to 6pm Friday, March 21, 2014, to Central Texas nonprofits.

Mark your calendars! On March 20, 2014 at 6:00pm you can donate to help us fulfill our mission and be apart of a community wide day of giving!

You can continue that support through giving on March 20, 2014  Amplify Austin Day,a program of I Live Here I Give Here. Boost our community and give back!
 
In 2013, the first year, 320 nonprofits participated in Amplify Austin they are expecting over 400 to participate in 2014. Amplify Austin raises much-needed funds for nonprofits of all sizes, in all areas of service.

Their first year results were spectacular, their goal was $1 million and they raised $2.8 million! The 2014, goal is $4 million.  

WVWA's Mission : To advocate for clean, clear flowing springs and streams and the sustained the health of the Wimberley Valley and to engage the community in land and water stewardship through research and education at the Jacob's Well Natural Area.

                                                   Schedule Your Gift Now!   

A generous donor has agreed to match your donation to WVWA!  For all funds raised through Amplify Austin Day, your contribution will be matched to double the impact of your investment in the crystal clear spring water flowing from Jacob's Well all the way to Barton Springs! 

Water Enough? Documentary Film co-sponsored by Austin Film Society

WVWA is working with Austin Film Society and filmmakers Robert Currie and Salwa Khan to produce a documentary film to educate the public about Texas water issues. Water Enough? is a documentary about Texans impacted by drought, told in their own words, and about those who are working to help alleviate the possible devastating consequences of a prolonged drought through innovation, planning, and political action.
The film will explore ways in which the widening gap between supply and demand can and must be met. It will provide answers in the stories of individuals and communities that are tackling difficult water issues every day. Rather than simply detailing the crisis that exists, we intend to show that Texans can find different ways to live with less water. Creative new way of thinking about water use may be what leads to long-term solutions to the growing populations' demands.
Jacob's Well Community Garden Project
WVWA, with the help of local volunteers, has established a community garden on property adjacent to the Jacob's Well Natural Area. The community garden currently has sixteen garden plots being utilized by the local residents and students. Improvements to the property include new fencing, raised beds, rainwater catchment and a composting system. Expanded programs requiring additional funding include community education and outreach programs on the site and a capital improvement project for expanded rainwater harvesting capacity, a greenhouse, food forest and a native plant demonstration garden.
The WVWA is creating a demonstration site for sustainable design including rainwater harvesting for residences and businesses in the Hill Country. We are expanding our programs at The Retreat to provide an opportunity to immerse in the natural environment for educational and experiential workshops for youth and adults, corporate team building, and environmental awareness events. Additional capital funding is needed for completing rainwater harvesting systems, renovation of the event center and community meeting space, expanded water treatment and reuse systems for on-site bathroom facilities, permaculture demonstration gardens and additional low impact tent structures.
Posted: March 18, 2014 13:37   Go to blog
Press Release - Build Smart Water NowMarch 18, 2014 13:18
 For Immediate Release
Contacts: Tom Hegemier P.E., ChairCentral Texas Land/Water Sustainability ForumTom.Hegemier@rpsgroup.com512 326 5659
Christy Muse, Executive Director Hill Country Alliancechristy@hillcountryalliance.org512.560.3135Build Water Smart Now
(March 17, 2014) We felt reassured by the fall rains, but most storms missed lakes Travis and Buchanan. Now the empty clouds of drought hover and the water supply clock ticks on...
 For Immediate Release

Contacts: Tom Hegemier P.E., Chair
Central Texas Land/Water Sustainability Forum

Christy Muse, Executive Director
Hill Country Alliance
Build Water Smart Now

(March 17, 2014) We felt reassured by the fall rains, but most storms missed lakes Travis and Buchanan. Now the empty clouds of drought hover and the water supply clock ticks on. Drought again is a regular headline story: reservoirs are 38% full, driest January on record, hill country creek and river flows dwindle, most downstream farmers will not receive water for an unprecedented third year in a row, once–a-week lawn watering mandated for customers relying on LCRA supplies, increasing water rates with less use, and a threatened lawsuit to provide more fresh water to the river and bays to protect habitat. 

Contrast woeful water news with the following stories: Forbes magazine ranked Austin as the fastest growing city for the fourth year in a row, realtors stating that we don’t have enough houses to meet buyer demand, another industry is moving their headquarters to Austin, and the region’s job growth will continue to spur new home and apartment construction.  This growth tracks with State Water Plan projections that the central Texas population will double to over 3 million people by 2040. 

While we continue to reduce our water use, demands increase every day with new homes of suburbia appearing on the horizon.  Each will require more water, with a considerable amount going to establish and maintain hundreds of acres of new turf grass each year.  In this region, traditional home lawns typically consume 25 to 35% of the annual treated water.  Projecting into the future, new residential yards could require up to 30,000 acre-feet per year by 2040—enough water to meet about 20 percent of Austin’s current demand. 

Some call for a moratorium on new construction to end water demand growth until supplies rebound. But what is the economic impact of that drastic measure, both now and long-term?  Others recommend that cities pay homeowners to remove turf grass and replace with native plants.  Las Vegas has had success with such a strategy and Austin has a small-scale program but the program costs will be high to significantly shrink demands.

Courtesy of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Photographers: Andy/Sally Wasowski
One tool now available to manage lawn watering at no cost to existing water customers is “conservation landscaping.”  It relies on deep, high quality soils combined with native plants, trees, mulched areas, and most importantly limited turf to reduce outdoor water use by almost seventy-five percent.   Water quality is improved as limited to no lawn chemicals are necessary.  These landscapes, designed for our climate, improve neighborhood appearance and marketability. A recent Statesman article highlighted one woman’s natural yard in Manchaca: its summer-time color, neighborhood attraction, and, above all, that it doesn’t require water even in the hottest months. 

Conservation landscaping would be paid for by those that build homes rather than existing rate payers. It would, of course, be passed along to the cost of the home purchase. However, in only a few years, the water savings compared to a traditional lawn covers this increased installation cost.

Conservation landscaping is one option in the “Low Impact Development” (LID) toolbox that includes rainwater harvesting, permeable pavements, rain gardens, and others that help new developments use stormwater beneficially to reduce homeowner’s water bills and protect aquifer and lake levels.  The Central Texas Land Water Sustainability Forum (CTLWSF), a committee composed of private and public water resource professionals actively engaged in the LID water discussion, underscores that LCRA has offered conservation landscaping incentives since 2006 as part of their Highland Lakes water quality protection program.   The CTLWSF believes all central Texas governing bodies should do the same through immediate action so new development will reduce its water use.  This could be done through emergency rules and concise criteria to clearly define incentives and methods to facilitate permitting and construction.

The benefits will be both immediate, for the ongoing drought, and long-lasting, as annual demands remain more stable. When the next drought returns, as is inevitable, we will not be asked to drastically change our water use as it will already be used wisely.  By managing our water growth today we can reduce future water supply needs and rate increases.

We ask that you join with the CTLWSF and encourage cities and utilities to require all new homes and buildings to use conservation landscaping. What have we got to lose?  Our water, our economic future?

Tom Hegemier is the Chair of the Central Texas Land Water Sustainability Forum, a senior consulting water resources engineer at RPS and a technical advisor for the Hill Country Alliance.

Learn More about the Central Texas Land / Water Sustainability Forum:http://www.texaslid.org/single.php?page=chapters
Posted: March 18, 2014 13:18   Go to blog
Neighbor to Neighbor - News and EventsMarch 13, 2014 14:58


Neighbor to Neighbor News Pass it on...                    
March 13, 2014
Hill Country NewsAmerican Dream and the Economic Myth
Property is a thing. Happiness is an ideal, a story of the future created by the imagination. The American dream, even when it takes material form, is a wish the heart makes in its pursuit of happiness. It is an act of the imagination made vivid by the life and liberty that allow us to pursue it with hope...


Neighbor to Neighbor News Pass it on...                    

March 13, 2014

Hill Country News
American Dream and the Economic Myth
Property is a thing. Happiness is an ideal, a story of the future created by the imagination. The American dream, even when it takes material form, is a wish the heart makes in its pursuit of happiness. It is an act of the imagination made vivid by the life and liberty that allow us to pursue it with hope. Read and share one of our timeless favorite pieces by Betty Sue Flowers.

SAWS: Yes to Desal Plant, Maybe to Pipeline
The San Antonio Water System board voted unanimously Tuesday to fund Phase I construction of a brackish water desalination plant in southern Bexar County – the most ambitious water diversification project in the city’s history – and enter negotiations with the Vista Ridge Consortium to provide San Antonio with an even greater supply of new water via a privately-owned regional pipeline, a second diversification project of unprecedented scope and cost. Read more from the Rivard Report.

Registration is open for the Annual Kent Butler Summit
Faucets, Toilets, and Automobiles: Balancing Growth and Sustainability in the Barton Springs Aquifer Region. Join us Friday, April 25th for a day of learning at the Lady Bird Wildflower Center. Click here to learn more and register online.

Texas’ Most Endangered Places

Nominations are now being accepted for the Preservation Texas, Most Endangered Place list. Some wonderful places in the Hill Country already grace this list including the Spettel Riverside House in Bandera County, The Old Llano County Jail, Hamilton Pool, Scenic Loop-Boerne Stage Corridor and statewide, Texas Dance Halls! The deadline is fast approaching, March 21st, take it upon yourself to nominate an iconic Hill Country treasure. Learn More

‘Art and Conservation’ to feature landowner-artist partnerships to promote Hill Country conservation
Hill Country-area artists and landowners are invited to join together to promote conservation of the region’s natural resources during “Art and Conservation: Our Hidden Treasures,” a collaboration between the Cibolo Nature Center & Farm and the Hill Country Council for the Arts. Learn More

Meet TWDB's new Agricultural and Rural Texas Ombudsman
"The ag ombudsman is helping us spread the word to rural communities about the SWIFT and the benefits it will offer to those communities," says TWDB Chairman Carlos Rubinstein. "His effort is a critical part of our SWIFT outreach and our outreach on many other programs." Read More

Learn about Fredericksburg SHINES
Promoting Solar, Electric Vehicle charging stations, Zero Waste, Bicycling, Water Efficiency… Fredericksburg SHINES is striving to make Fredericksburg become the most sustainable community in Texas! Read their most recent newsletter and get involved.

Medina Lake Water Well Meeting March 17
The Medina Lake Preservation Society (MLPS) has invited officials from the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to speak with LakePlex citizens about drought assistance availability for communities and individual well owners. Details


Symposium Will Explore Issues Facing Iconic Pedernales River, March 20 in Fredericksburg
The first Texas Water Symposium of 2014 will feature a conversation between Hill Country landowners and water experts about the Pedernales River. As Central Texas grapples with population growth, land fragmentation and changing land uses, understanding the impact of land and water management on the health of our rivers and their associated catchment areas is essential. Find out more.




Upcoming Events
March

March 13 in Fredericksburg - Solarize Gillespie County - Presented by Fredericksburg SHINES - Details
March 17-23 - National Wildlife Week! "Wildlife and Water: From the Mountains to the Rivers to the Oceans" - National Wildlife Week gives families, educators and community groups the chance to connect kids with wildlife and explore the world around them - Details

March 20 in Johnson City - Update on the progress of the Science Mill Opening in November, 2014 - Details
March 20 in Fredericksburg - Texas Water Symposium - "The Pedernales: Challenges and Opportunities Facing an Iconic Hill Country River Basin" - Details
March 20 in Boerne - Hill Country Water: Myths and Truths - Presented by Cow Creek Groundwater District Directors Milan J. Michalec and Bob Webster - Details
March 21-22 in Bandera - First event in the Bandera County Water Awareness Series - Workshop free and open to the public - Details
March 22 in San Antonio - Movie, Kites and Potluck with Greenspaces Alliance - Film: Urban Roots - Details
March 22 in Johnson City - Master Gardeners of Blanco County host Invaders of Texas Workshop - Details
March 26 in Sequin - Agriculture and Rural Development Workshop - Details
March 26-28 in Fort Worth - Texas Trails and Active Transportation Conference - Details
March 29-30 in Stonewall - LBJ 100 Cycling Weekend - Details
Posted: March 13, 2014 14:58   Go to blog
Dripping Springs proposes wastewater discharges into Onion creekMarch 12, 2014 14:41
Posted: 12:00 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014

By Asher Price - American-Statesman Staff DRIPPING SPRINGS — Gearing up for a seemingly ever-increasing population, this once-sleepy outpost west of Austin is plotting an expansion of its sewage treatment plant for as much as $28.6 million, the latest sign of massive growth in northern Hays County.

City officials say the infrastructure move is a responsible one because it would prevent a proliferation of smaller plants in the region, but it has alienated some of their former regional allies in bygone environmental battles...
Posted: 12:00 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014

By Asher Price - American-Statesman Staff
Gearing up for a seemingly ever-increasing population, this once-sleepy outpost west of Austin is plotting an expansion of its sewage treatment plant for as much as $28.6 million, the latest sign of massive growth in northern Hays County.

City officials say the infrastructure move is a responsible one because it would prevent a proliferation of smaller plants in the region, but it has alienated some of their former regional allies in bygone environmental battles.

If an expansion is approved by a state environmental agency, something probably years away, the plant could be the second to have a permit to discharge cleaned-up waste water into a Hill Country creek that eventually feeds the Barton Springs portion of the Edwards Aquifer.
Nearly a decade ago, Dripping Springs had teamed up with the city of Austin, the Barton Springs-Edwards Aquifer Groundwater Conservation District and other governmental entities to oppose a similar plant proposed — and eventually built — for Belterra, a burgeoning subdivision just east of Dripping Springs. At the time, Dripping Springs had been a key player in a regional planning effort to manage development.

Now it is Dripping Springs that is considering an expanded plant as it both copes with a growing population and positions itself to recruit new businesses.
Dripping Springs has increased from about 1,500 residents in 2000 to nearly 1,900 in 2012, according to census figures. Roughly 30,000 people live in the wider community around the city.

The existing wastewater treatment plant, built to replace antiquated septic systems, has a capacity to treat 127,500 gallons per day and currently treats half that much.

A year ago, the city’s economic development committee, chaired by former state Rep. Patrick Rose, who runs a title company based in Dripping Springs, declared in a letter to the mayor that the lack of capacity undermines the city’s ability to meet the needs of existing residents, manage new growth and to “recruit additional, quality primary employers to our community.”

The city then hired an engineering firm. Using what it says is a moderate projection — an annual growth rate of 8 percent — the firm forecast in a $94,000 report that the plant will reach 90 percent of its capacity by 2017, and that by 2023 it will have to treat 199,615 gallons per day.

The city currently uses treated wastewater to irrigate city-owned land. The engineering firm recommended expanding the plant to a capacity of 750,000 gallons per day. Treated wastewater could be sprayed on city-owned playing fields and land at new subdivisions tying into the plant, but the engineering firm recommended also seeking permission from the state to discharge into Onion Creek. The direct discharge permit would give the plant another option for handling cleaned-up sewer water in case it outstrips the demand to irrigate neighboring lands.

City Council member Bill Foulds said a centralized plant run by the city will cut down the risk from Belterra-like plants scattered around the Hill Country. Providing wastewater services to subdivisions in its suburbs also gives the city some leverage in managing development, such as requiring construction setbacks from area waterways. The new developments would pay for the lion’s share of the plant expansion, which will likely be more modest than the $28.6 million expansion envisioned by the engineering firm, he said.

Under state standards, the effluent should be clean enough to fish or swim in.
Salt Lick restaurant owner Scott Roberts, whose family has owned property fronting Onion Creek since 1902, says he is not concerned about potential treated sewage discharges upriver of him — as long as it is treated properly.

“Right now I’m comfortable with the motivation and intentions of Dripping Springs,” he said. “They’re not out there to create a sea of concrete. They really are committed to making sure development in their jurisdiction takes place conscientiously.”
Austin officials are monitoring the plant expansion prospects.


“It’s great they’re looking forward to plan infrastructure to facilitate growth,” said Chris Herrington, a city of Austin environmental engineer. “But the question is, are they rushing to make decision that would be controversial for a lot of people?”

If the Belterra scenario plays itself out again, downstream cities, residents or environmental groups could contest the discharge permit before it wins approval.
“There’s a huge potential for disastrous water-quality impacts,” Herrington said.

Posted: March 12, 2014 14:41   Go to blog
Texas Water Symposium - March 20 in FredericksburgMarch 11, 2014 15:40
Join usTexas Water SymposiumThe Pedernales: Challenges and Opportunities Facing an Iconic River BasinThursday, March 207:00 pm to 8:30 pm in FredericksburgDownload Flyer


...
Join us
Texas Water Symposium
The Pedernales: Challenges and Opportunities Facing an Iconic River Basin
Thursday, March 20
7:00 pm to 8:30 pm in Fredericksburg
Posted: March 11, 2014 15:40   Go to blog
News from The Natural GardenerMarch 11, 2014 12:05

Good morning, JWCG gardeners!

In case you're interested, I'm forwarding the Natural Gardener newsletter.  We have a great place here in Wimberley (King Feed) that stocks garden plants, soil amendments, etc for organic gardeners, but if you want to explore even more farther out from our village, I recommend The Natural Gardener in Oak Hill on Old Bee Caves Rd.  You may also subscribe to their newsletter to get the latest info on plants, pests, etc for gardening in our part of central Texas.  In the past they have been very helpful with answering questions...

Good morning, JWCG gardeners!

In case you're interested, I'm forwarding the Natural Gardener newsletter.  We have a great place here in Wimberley (King Feed) that stocks garden plants, soil amendments, etc for organic gardeners, but if you want to explore even more farther out from our village, I recommend The Natural Gardener in Oak Hill on Old Bee Caves Rd.  You may also subscribe to their newsletter to get the latest info on plants, pests, etc for gardening in our part of central Texas.  In the past they have been very helpful with answering questions.  Also, they hold FREE seminars several times a year, including a very good one titled "Organic Gardening 101", usually offered early spring, to get new and experienced organic gardeners off to a good start.  The forwarded newsletter tells you how to subscribe if interested.

Karen


  
    HAPPY SPRING BREAK AND SXSW! This weekend kicks off a fun time of year in Austin, and it‘s the        
    beginning of the most exciting & most beautiful season at The Natural Gardener. This is the time of year when 
    our world-renowned nursery really shines. Please come see us and bring your friends. Bring your camera, too 
    – Spatz is more handsome than ever these days!
 If the weather’s a little yucky (rain’s predicted, hallelujah) consider coming out anyway. Tomatoes will be on sale, and there’s a whole lot of fun stuff to see, to do, and to buy. (Gorgeous new plants and pottery, especially!) There’s a lot that needs to be done in the garden right now, and just as many things that should wait. Come see us, and we’ll help you navigate this tricky time of year. 


TOMATO SALE- SATURDAY AND SUNDAY ONLY
It’s Tomato-planting time! All sizes and varieties are 10% OFF this weekend. We’re sure to have another frost or two, so stop by our Info Desk for planting and weather-proofing tips. See IN THE NURSERY below for a list of varieties.


LATE THURSDAYS START NEXT WEEK
Starting next Thursday, March 13th, we’ll be staying open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays. Stop in after work on Thursday, and get a head start on your weekend gardening projects. 


IN THE MICROBE BREWERY
South Austin boasts some great home brews, including ours. We make rich Aerobic Compost Tea that plants love. (You should see ‘em after a couple of gallons of the stuff – watch out!) Our tea is brewed fresh each week, and it’s good for any kind of plant growing in any kind of soil. One gallon costs just $6.50 and will cover 2,500 square feet undiluted, or 5,000 square feet when mixed with one gallon of rain or distilled water. Bring your own clean container with a lid and it’s only $5 per gallon. Our home-brewed Aerobic Compost Tea is available Thursday through Sunday only.


IN THE NURSERY
TOMATOES: Store-bought can never compare with the taste of homegrown organic. We have transplants of slicers, cherries, grape and paste tomatoes -- in both heirloom and hybrid varieties. Thousands of plants and no GMO's* ever! *Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are organisms in which the DNA has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally. Visit www.who.int/foodsafety  for more info. This week's tomato varieties include:

Arkansas Traveler
Homestead
Roma
Better Boy
Japanese Black Trifle 
Rutgers
Bing
Large Red Cherry
Stupice
Black Plum
Marglobe
Sungold
Celebrity
Matt's Wild Cherry
Super Fantastic
Champion
Momotaro
Sweet 100
Cherokee Purple
Mortgage Lifter
Sweet Olive
Cupid
Peacevine Cherry
Tomatoberry
Gardener's Delight
Phoenix
Tycoon
Green Tiger
Pink Tiger
Valencia
Health Kick
Pruden's Purple
Yellow Pear
 
 
IN THE STORE
PLANTING TOMATOES? PLANT AN OLLA FIRST: An olla is a long-necked water urn made of very porous, low-fired clay. Ollas were “invented” by ancient dry-land farmers, and – go figure – those potters/farmers really knew what they were doing. Today, ollas are making a comeback in arid regions all over the world. You bury an olla in the ground leaving the opening just above the soil. Plant seeds or starts a few inches away, give your transplants an initial watering with a hose or watering can, and fill the olla, too. Water will slowly seep out into the soil to about the same distance as the radius of the urn. Slow, steady watering is good for all sorts of plants, Tomatoes especially. Tomatoes are tropical plants, and they love the slow, consistent moisture provided by an olla.

TRANSPLANT & BLOOM FERTILIZER – FLOWER POWER 25# BAG:  Flower Power is not just for flowers, it’s perfect for any new planting; vegetables, herbs, even newly-sodded lawns. That’s because the same elements that promote blooming (phosphorus and potassium) also promote healthy root and stem growth. In addition to those elements, there’s also the perfect amount of natural, slow-release nitrogen. It gently feeds emerging leaves, in just the right amount for this time of year. Flower Power is available in a 25 lb. bag that will cover 1,440 square feet. 


IN THE SOIL YARD
TURKEY COMPOST – GARDENER’S GOLD: Vegetables, flowers, and lawns will thrive from a springtime application of Lady Bug brand All American Turkey Compost. Turkey Compost is rich in nutrients and beneficial microorganisms, and it provides a gentle, natural feeding to your plants. It helps your soil hold water, too. For new, unplanted gardens or flower beds, add a few inches of Turkey Compost, mix in, and water to settle the soil. Do this a couple of days prior to planting. For existing beds, lay ¼ to ½ inch over the root zone of your plants and water it in. (Be sure that stems and trunks aren’t covered, though. You don’t want anything – compost, soil, or even mulch – resting on the stem of your plants.) If your lawn needs some love this spring, give it a topdressing of ¼ to ½ inch, and water in. Give all your plants some Turkey Compost this spring – you’ll be amazed by the results.

You can get our good, rich composts in several ways: we can deliver to you, we can load compost into your truck or trailer, you can bag-it-yourself, AND it comes pre-bagged. To determine how much compost you need, use the handy Cubic Yard Calculator  on our website.

For more information on our products and services, visit www.naturalgardeneraustin.com


ON THE GO WITH JOHN
GARDENING NATURALLY ON KLBJ RADIO: John Dromgoole has been hosting his  “Gardening Naturally” call-in radio show for over 33 years on KLBJ 590AM Austin. Gardening Naturally airs 9-11am Saturdays, and 8-10am on Sundays. Every Saturday and Sunday, you have a chance to ask John, and his expert guests your gardening questions live on the air. Call in locally at 512-836-0590, or toll free at 877-590-KLBJ (5525). You can also listen to Gardening Naturally online at http://www.newsradioklbj.com/ 
     
CENTRAL TEXAS GARDENER & KXAN FIRSTCAST: Saturday mornings on KXAN News 36 Firstcast- around 7:20- John gives gardeners a little seasonal advice. Tune into KLRU for “Central Texas Gardener” where John co-hosts the “Backyard Basics” segment. “Central Texas Gardener” is aired on Saturdays at noon and 4:00 p.m., and repeats at 9 a.m. on Sundays. “Central Texas Gardener” is now available on five Texas public television stations, and can be viewed online. For more information go to www.klru.org/ctg/.

KDRP SOLAR-POWERED RADIO: “Dance Halls and Last Calls” is John Dromgoole’s old style country and western music show. John hosts his show on Wednesdays from 8-9pm, and the show repeats on Sundays from 1-2pm. Tune in to KDRP (Texas’ only solar-powered radio station) at 100.1 FM Austin or 103.1 Dripping Springs. You can also listen online @ http://www.kdrplive.org Tune in! 
See you in the garden...
THE NATURAL GARDENER
8648 Old Bee Caves Road
Austin, Texas 78735
512-288-6113

BUSINESS HOURS (hours change seasonally*)
Monday through Saturday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday: 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

*Beginning March 13, we’ll be open ‘til 7 p.m. on Thursdays.

Please visit us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, too.

Have a comment or concern? We want to hear it! Please email us at info@naturalgardeneraustin.com

Copyright 2013 The Natural Gardener
8648 Old Bee Caves Road • Austin, Texas 78735
Phone: 512.288.6113 • Fax: 512.288.6114
 



Posted: March 11, 2014 12:05   Go to blog

Posted: March 07, 2014 14:59   Go to blog
Texas Stream Team Spring NewsletterMarch 07, 2014 10:38

Head Waters:
2014 has kicked off and we're excited about all of the activities planned for Texas Stream Team in the coming year. We seem to have started off the year with some rather cold winter, and this was evident in many of the water quality data reports that our citizen scientists submitted for January and February. Thank you to all of those monitors who braved the elements in order to get your data in to us...

Head Waters:
2014 has kicked off and we're excited about all of the activities planned for Texas Stream Team in the coming year. We seem to have started off the year with some rather cold winter, and this was evident in many of the water quality data reports that our citizen scientists submitted for January and February. Thank you to all of those monitors who braved the elements in order to get your data in to us. We really appreciate your commitment to Texas Stream Team! Spring is just around the corner though, and it will be a great time to get outside.

Our staff at The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, and our network of Texas Stream Team Instructors, have conducted several trainings over the past couple of months and have certified many new Citizen Scientists. If you are new to Texas Stream Team, then welcome aboard! Please browse through our newsletter to learn about our program, the partners in our network, and our citizen scientists who are dedicated to protecting Texas waters. Thanks, and I'll see you out on the water!
Travis Tidwell
Monitoring Program Coordinator

Partner Spotlight: Texas Stream Team Partners with Pan Am University of Texas  
By: Lindsay Sansom   

Texas Stream Team (TST) recently formed a new partnership with a dedicated group of undergraduate researchers from Pan AM University of Texas, with Dr. Jungseok Ho as the principal investigator.



Aquatic Plant Series: Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)  

By: Taylor Ream  


Description: Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an invasive aquatic plant species that can form thick mats in freshwater ecosystems. It varies in height from several centimeters (cm) to over three feet (ft.) tall. Water hyacinth has distinctive flowers with six petals that can range in color from light blue to violet. One of the six petals has a characteristic yellow spot surrounded by darker shades of purple.  


Texas Stream Team Data: What is it used for?
 By: Travis Tidwell


Texas Stream Team citizen Scientists are trained to collect water quality data from monitoring locations across Texas.  The parameters that these monitors measure, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and water clarity, are all collected under an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.
  
Read the full article
Posted: March 07, 2014 10:38   Go to blog
Jacobs Well Community Garden opens its 2014 Spring/Summer gardening seasonMarch 05, 2014 10:30


The spring/summer season at Jacobs Well Community Garden officially began March 1.   In addition to most of our former gardeners, we have welcomed some newcomers to the garden and still have several beds available for others who want to garden with us this season.An organic garden, JWCG welcomes both the experienced and the novice gardener.  There is always something new to learn in gardening organically.  The garden has a small lending library that is helpful to gardeners throughout the seasons...


The spring/summer season at Jacobs Well Community Garden officially began March 1.   In addition to most of our former gardeners, we have welcomed some newcomers to the garden and still have several beds available for others who want to garden with us this season.
An organic garden, JWCG welcomes both the experienced and the novice gardener.  There is always something new to learn in gardening organically.  The garden has a small lending library that is helpful to gardeners throughout the seasons.  Whether it's choosing the right plants or battling the pests that inevitably appear, our library as well as our "seasoned" gardeners are a great resource.
At the start of only our third year of gardening, the JWCG is still growing.  Our mission is to build, grow, and sustain the Wimberley Valley's first community organic garden with rainwater collection system.   

Gardening at JWCG is open to anyone in the Wimberley Valley who pays a one-time membership fee of $25 plus a $30 rental fee per garden bed reserved.  Concrete block raised garden beds are approximately 4 feet wide and 14 feet long.  Soil and tap water are provided.  Currently we have one rainwater collection tank on-site, and have plans to vastly increase rain collection as a major source of water for the garden.  Our rainwater collection plans will be realized as more member-gardeners and funds increase.
Whether your interest is in hands-on gardening, supporting good locally-grown food, or volunteering for garden projects, the Jacobs Well Community (Organic) Garden has a place for you.  
For more information or to reserve a garden bed, call garden coordinators Karen @ 512-568-4462 or Tom @ 512-940-6828
Posted: March 05, 2014 10:30   Go to blog
The Hill Country Land Trust Co-Sponsors Pedernales Water Symposium in FredericksburgMarch 04, 2014 12:08
HCLT is co-sponsoring with the Hill Country Alliance and others:
March 20, 2014
in FredericksburgHill Country University Center
program 7:00 - 8:30pm

On the panel will be HCLT Board member, Pam Mabry Bergman, who owns land in the Pedernales Watershed area.
Please make plans to join us at this important event!

full page flyer here: http://hillcountrylandtrust...
HCLT is co-sponsoring with the Hill Country Alliance and others:
March 20, 2014
in Fredericksburg
Hill Country University Center
program 7:00 - 8:30pm

On the panel will be HCLT Board member, Pam Mabry Bergman, who owns land in the Pedernales Watershed area.
Please make plans to join us at this important event!


full page flyer here: http://hillcountrylandtrust.org/news-photos/events/?preview=true&preview_id=142&preview_nonce=390573f2e0
Posted: March 04, 2014 12:08   Go to blog
California’s Drought: Cheap Water, But No Free LunchMarch 04, 2014 11:48
Posted by Peyton Fleming in Water Currents on February 14, 2014        Written by Sharlene Leurig:
Today, President Obama visitedCalifornia’s Central Valley, which may be in the midst of the driest winter incenturies. The President’s visit brings along with it federal disaster relieffor farmers and communities on the verge of running dry. While the near termaid will be welcome relief to many, it won’t be nearly enough to protectCalifornia’s economy—or America’s food supply—from the water shortages that arecoming.
The reason why? California’s water supply is overly dependent on two highly at-risk sources: runoff from mountain snowpack and groundwater...

Posted by Peyton Fleming in Water Currents on February 14, 2014       
 Written by Sharlene Leurig:


The reason why? California’s water supply is overly dependent on two highly at-risk sources: runoff from mountain snowpack and groundwater.

California relies on snowpack to store much of its water. As a result, reservoirs weren’t designed to hold as much surface water as the state uses. Yet by 2050, it’s predicted that a typical California snow season will produce 25-80% less than average historic snowfall. The problem is not only reduced precipitation, but also higher temperatures that will mean less snow and more rain. Without reservoirs, rain can’t be captured and stored for when water is needed most. The trouble is, reservoirs are nearly impossible to permit in today’s regulatory environment (often for good reason). So some other form of storage will have to replace what will be lost as snowy winters become more rare.
Which brings us to groundwater. It’s the cheapest source around, and a reliable alternative in dry years when water deliveries from the state’s rivers are curtailed. It’s also virtually unregulated in the state, meaning there are plenty of places where anyone can drill a well and pump without limit. As a result, California’s groundwater resources are gravely imperiled. Satellite data has recently shown that between 2012-2013, as surface water allocations became increasingly constrained, the state’s primary agricultural basins pumped a volume of groundwater equivalent to the rest of the state’s total water use.
 
Groundwater storage changes in California from 2003-2010. From the GRL paper by Famiglietti et al, 2011. Blue line shows overall decreasing trend, about 3 cubic kilometers per year. Red line shows piecewise trends, and that most of the depletion occurred during the drought of 2006-2010. Link: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/02/04/epic-california-drought-and-groundwater-where-do-we-go-from-here/
As long as mountain runoff is the state’s primary water source and groundwater is unregulated, California’s water security will be in jeopardy.
So, after the federal emergency funds are spent, what should we do to start investing in California’s long-term water security?
Diversify: California water providers must develop more resilient local supplies. This means investments in technologies like efficiency and water reuse that make existing supplies go farther. It also means developing new storage systems like aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), which makes use of groundwater aquifers as underground reservoirs to store water until it’s needed. For ASR to work, groundwater must be regulated—otherwise there is no assurance that someone else won’t pump the water before you can reclaim your investment.
Price: Water is notoriously underpriced (and groundwater not at all). Most of the attention on water rates usually gets paid to agriculture, where water users are paying as little as $6 for every acre-foot of water (equal to around 325,000 gallons). But even though urban areas account for only 10% of all water used in California, there are still huge gains to be made in using pricing to reduce wasteful water use. Public water providers are too often constrained in their ability to convey pricing signals, thanks to Proposition 218, which has been used to overturn conservation-incentivizing water rate structures. To overcome this obstacle, water providers need to be more transparent about the avoided capital costs of new supply that are being “priced-in” to rate structures. This should be a top priority of the California Urban Water Conservation Council, which is now revisiting its Best Management Practices for urban water pricing.
Share: Farming accounts for some 75% of the state’s water use. There’s no way of getting around the reality that California’s water security depends on moving some water from farming to other users, including cities and the environment. But the vitality of California’s farming industry also has to be protected. Half of America’s fruits and vegetables are raised in California. And some of America’s most well-known food brands depend on California’s agriculture: 30 percent of the world’s processing tomatoes, used by companies like Campbell Soup, for example, come from California.
These are steps that must be taken by Californians, and supported by companies and investors with an economic interest in California. At stake is the food security of a nation, and the financial vitality of corporations all over the world.
Sharlene Leurig is director of the sustainable water infrastructure program at Ceres. Ceres is a nonprofit organization mobilizing business and investor leadership on global sustainability challenges. Follow her on Twitter @sleurig and learn more about Ceres at www.ceres.org/valuingeverydrop.

Posted: March 04, 2014 11:48   Go to blog
Hays County Water Security - At What Price? February 26, 2014 14:49
Hays County is gambling one million tax payer dollars a year on our water future. Citizens Alliance for Responsible Development believes our elected officials need to show the taxpayers of Hays County that this is a sound bet, not wasted tax money that will never hold water.

In October, 2013, Hays County Commissioners Court approved a multi-million dollar contract with the private Forestar Real Estate Group to reserve and purchase groundwater pumped from the Simsboro aquifer in Lee County, 70 miles east of San Marcos...
Hays County is gambling one million tax payer dollars a year on our water future. Citizens Alliance for Responsible Development believes our elected officials need to show the taxpayers of Hays County that this is a sound bet, not wasted tax money that will never hold water.

In October, 2013, Hays County Commissioners Court approved a multi-million dollar contract with the private Forestar Real Estate Group to reserve and purchase groundwater pumped from the Simsboro aquifer in Lee County, 70 miles east of San Marcos. The Texas Attorney General's office has been asked to give "an opinion confirming Hays County's authority to enter into and carry out the transactions contemplated by the agreement, including the use of ad valorem (property) tax revenues for payment of all costs." That opinion is still pending.

The contract calls for Hays County to pay Forestar a "base rate" of $1 million every year, beginning October 1, 2013, to reserve 45,000 acre-feet (14.66 trillion gallons) a year. With growing concerns of future water shortages, this may sound like a foresighted hedge against Hays County citizens running out of water. But is it that simple?

  • Currently Hays County has no identified customers for this groundwater. No engineering study shows that Hays County needs, or will need, this amount of imported water. It can be argued that future growth and possible continued drought and climate change will make it necessary. But when?
  • Forestar, which has applied for the pumping rights from the Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District, has been approved for ONLY 12,000 acre feet of groundwater, a mere 27% of what they are "reserving" for Hays County's $1 million tax dollars. It appears that Forestar intends to seek the additional 33,000 acre-feet per year through a lawsuit filed against the Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District. Hays County will support Forestar, but a decision could take years, during which Hays continues to pay $1 million annually.
  • The million dollars a year, while significant, is just a drop in the water bucket. If Hays County ever wants to obtain and use that water, it faces major additional expenses. The costs of the pipelines, storage facilities, treatment facilities, pump stations, rights of way and so forth to bring the groundwater from Lee County into Hays County have not been identified. These costs are expected to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars, to be paid by water customers or tax payers. These facility costs would be many times greater -- and in addition to -- the cost of the reserved and delivered groundwater from the Forestar well fields. Where is the engineering study showing tax payers the true cost of this venture?
  • While all contracts such as this are presented in open court meetings, most tax payers in Hays County are unaware of the financial implications of this massive undertaking to import groundwater for future use within Hays County.
Hays County Judge Bert Cobb has stated: "We must reserve water in the name of Hays County now, before we are forced to buy water from private companies at whatever price they demand. It is my goal to keep water in Hays County. This water reservation contract represents an insurance policy for Hays County and its citizens."

There is little doubt that future water shortages are likely, and good water conservation practices and regulations are increasingly urgent. CARD applauds efforts to solve these problems with plans supported by engineering and economic studies. If there is compelling evidence that this expenditure with Forestar is sound policy, and will actually supply water, then it needs to be shared with the public, which will soon be paying its costs.

County Commissioner Will Conley has said the County may terminate the contract with 90 days' notice and will review the termination option annually. CARD representatives have met with Commissioner Conley about the Forestar contract. Conley said the Commissioners Court intends to hold a public "water meeting" to provide insight into the County's vision for the reserved water and allow the public to ask questions. Months have passed. A date for the meeting has not been set. It should be soon and well publicized.

CARD calls on the Hays County Commissioners to schedule this public "water meeting," and suggests that Hays citizens attend this meeting, ask questions, make suggestions and carefully follow this important discussion. These are your tax dollars being committed by the Commissioners Court.

CARD Steering Committee
Posted: February 26, 2014 14:49   Go to blog
TRIB+Water Volume: 2 Issue: 5February 26, 2014 11:41

Welcome to Trib+Water, a water news wrap-up and analysis prepared every other week by The Texas Tribune and the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. We bring you the latest news and events concerning the river systems of Texas and important water issues on a state and regional level.

Vol: 2 Issue: 5: A Note From Andrew Sansomby Andrew SansomAn open letter from Andrew Sansom of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment on the launch of the revamped Trib+Water newsletter...

Welcome to Trib+Water, a water news wrap-up and analysis prepared every other week by The Texas Tribune and the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. We bring you the latest news and events concerning the river systems of Texas and important water issues on a state and regional level.


Vol: 2 Issue: 5:
by Andrew Sansom
An open letter from Andrew Sansom of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment on the launch of the revamped Trib+Water newsletter.

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has decided not to take action yet on a controversial plan that would almost surely cut off water from rice farmers in the lower Colorado River basin for a third straight year. 

In this week's Q&A, we interview Robert Gulley and Todd Votteler of Water Dispute Resolution LLC.

In this week's Bookshelf, our content partner Kirkus Reviews highlights Blue Revolution, The Next Tsunami and The Ripple Effect.

Yakona, a film that documents an impressionistic journey down the San Marcos River, from source to sea, will make its world premiere in Austin at South by Southwest.
Gov. Rick Perry has appointed Kathleen Thea Jackson, an engineer and former public affairs manager for Exxon Mobil Corp., to the Texas Water Development Board.
Kayakers and canoeists around the state are being invited to join the Texas Stream Team, a citizen science program that has been monitoring water quality in Texas waterways for 23 years.
According a new study financed by the University of Texas Energy Institute, the amount of water used in drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the Barnett Shale area in 2011 amounted to about 8.5 billion gallons, or about 4 percent of the water used in the 15-country region.
Despite the multiyear drought that has caused ranchers to sell millions of heads of cattle, Texas led the nation in livestock sales over the past five years.
California Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing a $25 billion plan to fix the state’s major water transport system, which transfers water by means of pumps and aqueducts from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to farms in the San Joaquin Valley and the state’s major coastal cities.
Using data from the Texas Water Development Board's reservoir status tracker, our auto-updating map visualizes the current state of Texas reservoirs.
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Posted: February 26, 2014 11:41   Go to blog
HCA Press Release - Photo Contest Kicks off March 1February 26, 2014 9:54
educationconservationcooperation
What’s your view of Hill Country Stewardship?  The Hill Country Alliance Photo Contest kicks off March 1st

2013 Grand Prize Winner: Tim Huchton(February 27, 2014) - The Hill Country Alliance (HCA) is seeking photographs that tell the story of our region’s stewardship ethic for publication in its 2015 calendar. The Texas Hill Country is a cherished place, yet it is threatened by land fragmentation, over-allocated rivers and aquifers, incompatible land development practices and a lack of understanding about appropriate stewardship...
education
conservation
cooperation

What’s your view of Hill Country Stewardship? 
The Hill Country Alliance Photo Contest kicks off March 1st


2013 Grand Prize Winner: Tim Huchton
(February 27, 2014) - The Hill Country Alliance (HCA) is seeking photographs that tell the story of our region’s stewardship ethic for publication in its 2015 calendar. The Texas Hill Country is a cherished place, yet it is threatened by land fragmentation, over-allocated rivers and aquifers, incompatible land development practices and a lack of understanding about appropriate stewardship.

The contest opens March 1 and runs through May 31. Winners receive cash prizes and appear in the popular HCA calendar and in various HCA educational products. Entering the contest is done easily online through the Hill Country Alliance website (www.hillcountryalliance.org).

Each year HCA produces a calendar featuring stunning photographs taken by amateurs and professionals – photos that target those special places that attract people to the Hill Country to visit and to live. “This year we are encouraging images that illustrate responsible stewardship choices, including native landscapes, riparian habitats and vistas created by local land conservation initiatives,” said HCA President Milan J. Michalec. “We will also consider photographic illustrations of a Hill Country that is stressed and not well stewarded. Such images can be a reality check about what’s happening on the ground. Our intention is to create a calendar that is a beautiful and educational reminder of all that the Hill Country is now, and the need for all of us to take care of it for the future.”

Too often we try to change the landscape we love to fit an image of what we perceive makes it even more beautiful. “In a way we are loving the Hill Country to death,” says Sky Jones-Lewey, HCA board member and past-president, “Unfortunately it can be a consumptive kind of love, love for sculpted and landscaped river banks, love for reflecting ponds filled with precious groundwater, love for hill top vistas and roads to get us there, and love for big green thirsty lawns. But there are better ways and we want to illustrate these better choices so Hill Country citizens can see them and be empowered to alter our course.”

HCA is a collaboration of diverse people and organizations whose purpose is to raise public awareness and build community support around the need to protect the natural resources and heritage of the Texas Hill Country. According to Michalec, “Our goal is a Texas Hill Country whose charm is sustainable into the future for all to enjoy.”
Posted: February 26, 2014 9:54   Go to blog
Forestar Bulletin: Second Rehearing Request DeniedFebruary 21, 2014 9:39



Last night the Lost Pines GCD Board of Directors re-reaffirmed their decision to limit the Forestar permit to 12,000 acre-feet per year when they denied Forestar's SECOND request for a rehearing (a re-rehearing).  This action once again makes final the Board's decision on the Forestar application.  We anticipate that Forestar will file suit against the Board any day now.       We continue to be very proud of the Lost Pines Board and thank them for standing strong in light of the harassment, intimidation and threats they have faced from Forestar ... a not-so-friendly corporate citizen...



Last night the Lost Pines GCD Board of Directors re-reaffirmed their decision to limit the Forestar permit to 12,000 acre-feet per year when they denied Forestar's SECOND request for a rehearing (a re-rehearing).  This action once again makes final the Board's decision on the Forestar application.  We anticipate that Forestar will file suit against the Board any day now.    
   
We continue to be very proud of the Lost Pines Board and thank them for standing strong in light of the harassment, intimidation and threats they have faced from Forestar ... a not-so-friendly corporate citizen.   
We understand that this struggle is not over, and look forward to working with them over the next year to strengthen their ability to manage our precious water resources.
Thank you, we have your back.       
************************
Other actions last night: 


In addition to denying Forestar's request for a second rehearing, the Board also denied its request for a contested case hearing on the Griffin Industries application for one existing well in Bastrop County to pump 224 acre-feet per year.  Apparently the Board agreed with Griffin's attorney and the public that this small well, some 23 1/2 miles away from the Forestar wells, is not a threat to Forestar, but rather, as stated by Griffin's attorney "a frivolous request to throw rocks back at the District."  We considered the request by Forestar to be an obstructionist action following on its earlier threat to close down the Board's permitting.  The Board then took action to allow the Griffith Industries well.

Finally, the Board approved Aqua Water Supply Corporations application to amend its permit thereby allowing Aqua to aggregate two wells so that an aggregate of 1,633 acre-feet per year may be produced (no increase in total production).     
************************
 To those who support our efforts and who support the Lost Pines Board: 
THANK YOU FOR SHOWING UP AND SHOW THE BOARD THAT YOU SUPPORT ITS CONSERVATIVE APPROACH  
TO PROTECTING THE GROUNDWATER UNDERNEATH  
BASTROP AND LEE COUNTIES.   
OUR JOB NOW IS TO DO ALL WE CAN TO BACK THE BOARD
DURING THE LAW SUITS THAT WILL LIKELY FOLLOW.     
 **************************************
   
ES logo jpg
GROUNDWATER BULLETIN   
January 2013
Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District Hearings

DrawdownDraw-down:  A Visual Perspective
PERMIT THIS NOT BANKRUPTCY
PRINT FLYER
What does "draw-down" resulting from groundwater pumping look like on a map?  As you may know, the Desired Future Conditions are established in terms of the draw-down, in feet, of aquifers in Bastrop and Lee counties and throughout the District. 

Recently, Environmental Stewardship obtained visual images based on the Groundwater Availability Model (GAM) used by the Lost Pines Groundwater Conservation District to evaluate the impact of proposed pumping from current permit applications on the Simsboro Aquifer.  Draw-down, measured in feet, is indicated on the contour lines of the maps below.  Click on Maps below to Enlarge

NOTICE:  Please keep in mind that the images below (except for Image 1) are for the PROPOSED permits ONLY (124,226 acre-feet/year) and DO NOT include EXISTING permits (45,365 acre-feet/year). 

GMA-DFC-Drawdown

Image 1.  PERMIT THIS - The draw-down, in feet, expected when the Adopted Desired Future Conditions (DFC) are met in Bastrop and Lee counties. The dark area in Burleson County is from Post Oak Savannah GCD pumping.  Click on Map to Enlarge

AllPermits100%Drawdown
Image 2.  NOT WATER BANKRUPTCY - The draw-down, in feet, expected if ALL current applications are approved and pumped to the maximum permitted.  Notice the red area in Lee county where draw-down is 1000 ft, and orange area in Bastrop County where draw-down is 750 ft.  Click on Map to Enlarge

Forestar100%
 Image 3.  WATER BANKRUPTCY - The majority of draw-down, in feet, in Lee County is from the proposed Forestar well field.  Click on Map to Enlarge

EndOp100%
Image 4.  WATER BANKRUPTCY - The majority of draw-down, in feet, in Bastrop County is from the proposed End Op well field, which is directly below Houston Toad habitat.  Click on Map to Enlarge


PERMIT THIS: 
If permitted at all, individual permits should first be reduced to levels actually supported by the application and then all permits reduced overall as necessary to an aggregate level that, including existing permits, protects the Adopted Desired Future Conditions.  In summary, if permitted at all, Forestar and End Op qualify for less than 5% of the water they are seeking.  In addition, the district needs to factor in the impact of existing permits before issuing any new permits. This has not been done. (See Image 1). 

Forestar25%
Image 5.  This image depicts Forestar pumping reduced to 25% of requested pumping volume but DOES NOT include existing permits.  Click on Map to Enlarge

EndOp25%
Image 6.  This image depicts End Op pumping reduced to 25% of requested pumping volume but DOES NOT include existing permits.  Click on Map to Enlarge

websiteblog New Website and Blog
WebsiteHeaderLaGrangeWe are excited to announce that we have a new website and blog.  The site contains the same information that was on our old site, but now includes the ability to BLOG.  This means the site is MUCH MORE INTERACTIVE by allowing you, the reader, to make comments on specific pages and information posted.  We look forward to having a conversation with you about your interests and concerns. 

To visit our new website and blog click on this link.

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Environmental Stewardship is a charitable nonprofit organization whose purposes are to meet current and future needs of the environment and its inhabitants by protecting and enhancing the earth's natural resources; to restore and sustain ecological services using scientific information; and to encourage public stewardship through environmental education and outreach. 

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Posted: February 21, 2014 9:39   Go to blog
Making Waves in San AntonioFebruary 20, 2014 11:45
TEXAS WATER SOLUTIONS 02/18/2014 Making Waves in San AntonioBy Amy Hardberger While water is always a big topic for those of us at the blog, it has been a particular busy couple of weeks for water in San Antonio.  With a flurry of town hall meetings, film sneak peaks and big announcements, we thought it was time to catch up readers who may have missed the action.SAWS’s Big AnnouncementFirst, you might remember that San Antonio Water Systems (SAWS) was reviewing several groundwater purchase proposals...

TEXAS WATER SOLUTIONS

 02/18/2014
By Amy Hardberger 
While water is always a big topic for those of us at the blog, it has been a particular busy couple of weeks for water in San Antonio.  With a flurry of town hall meetings, film sneak peaks and big announcements, we thought it was time to catch up readers who may have missed the action.
SAWS’s Big Announcement
First, you might remember that San Antonio Water Systems (SAWS) was reviewing several groundwater purchase proposals.  Throughout the process, concerns were raised about transparency and whether the city really needed an additional 50,000 acre-feet of water.  Also, folks surrounding the Val Verde county proposal area were very worried about what the long-term effects of the export.
On February 3rd, after a three year proposal and review process, SAWS staff announced they recommended shelving all of the project proposals. Instead, staff recommended the further expansion of the brackish desalination project to meet future water needs.  While all of the details regarding the decision haven’t come to light, one of the biggest concerns appears to be tied to the inability of the companies to guarantee firm yield. Although the connection wasn’t explicitly made at the meeting, this is likely the result of uncertainty stemming from recent groundwater legal decisions.  The reality is that these legal decision have created uncertainties regarding the extent of local control over groundwater and no one wants to be left holding the bag if no water is delivered.
The announcement was followed by celebration by some and concern by others.  Several business leaders sent a letter asking for addition information regarding why such a long review process was not followed by the selection of a project.  They expressed concern for the city’s water future and requested a review of the projects and an open dialogue of what led to the decision.   Mayor Castro expressed his own uncertainty about the decision.  Hopefully this will lead the city to a larger conversation about demand projections and additional conservation opportunities.
Town Hall Meeting
The same day as the SAWS announcement, the Express News hosted a Town Hall Meeting on water.   While much of the conversation focused on SAWS’ recent announcement, the conversation was broader and ranged from water markets to Prop 6 opportunities.   Rep. Lyle Larson suggested breaking down the balkanization of water planning and shifting thinking about local water to seeing it as Texas water.  All the panel participants supported the idea that there is no silver bullet for water and that all cities are going to have to diversify their water supplies to remain viable.
An interesting discussion also occurred regarding water rates, conservation and expensive water supply projects.  Robert Puente, SAWS President/CEO, mentioned that one reason for their decision was that San Antonio was using less water than predicted because of successful conservation efforts, which the utility hopes to continue and expand because conserved water is the least expensive supply alternative.  The panel all agreed that new supply is expensive and Juan Gomez of UTSA explained that once expensive supply project are constructed, the business model shifts because the capitol costs must be repaid through rates, which can disincentivize conservation.  He cited recently mothballed desalination plants in Australia as an example of this concern.
SAWS Policy and Planning Meeting
A few days after the Town Hall Meeting, another large crowd turned out for the SAWS Policy and Planning Meeting, which again openly discussed the groundwater project deferral recommendation.  The purpose of the meeting was to inform the SAWS board of the staff findings.  The board had an opportunity to question staff on their recommendation and express their concerns, but they were not scheduled to take action.  There was also a focus on drought strategies and pros and cons of implementing drought stages.  Mr. Puente mentioned that SAWS will be bringing a newly revised Water Management Plan (WMP) to the board in March to reflect all their new recommendations. The Mayor mentioned that he wanted to approach the WMP discussion with flexibility to leave the door open for vendor options, particularly if the city can partner with other communities to share costs.
Making the Scene
And last, but certainly not least – there was a special sneak peak at UTSA of a new PBS documentary, Water Blues Green Solutions. The documentary features San Antonio as a city that has been innovative in its water use.  It focuses on the city’s water conservation and reuse efforts.  Our own Ken Kramer appears in the show, recounting how the Sierra Club lawsuit in the 1990s to protect endangered species helped put San Antonio on the road to being a leader in water efficiency.  A Q&A followed the viewing.  If you are interested in seeing the production on your local PBS station, check the schedule or contact the station.
In addition to being the focus of a documentary, San Antonio also received a visit from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Administrator Gina McCarthy, who toured the SAWS water recycling and solar power facilities.  Ms. McCarthy said the project is a model for the nation.  Cutting through all the technical speak, she stated simply: “You guys rock.”  Way to go San Antonio. Keep it up.


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Posted: February 20, 2014 11:45   Go to blog
Neighbor to Neighbor News February 18, 2014February 19, 2014 9:26
Neighbor to Neighbor News Pass it on...                     February 18, 2014
Hill Country News
Farm Bill Update: The Agriculture Act of 2014 and Conservation
With the enactment of the Agriculture Act of 2014, known to most of us as the Farm Bill, landowners have more certainty about the availability of federal funds for conservation on farm and ranch lands...
Neighbor to Neighbor News Pass it on...                    
February 18, 2014
Hill Country News
Farm Bill Update: The Agriculture Act of 2014 and Conservation
With the enactment of the Agriculture Act of 2014, known to most of us as the Farm Bill, landowners have more certainty about the availability of federal funds for conservation on farm and ranch lands. The Farm Bill provides up to $57 billion dollars over the next five years to support a variety of rural land conservation activities, including the dedication of conservation easements, and eliminates some of the complexity of the varied conservation programs. Read more from Braun & Gresham.
Public Invited to Outdoor Adventure Showcase at LBJ State Park
Lyndon B. Johnson State Park and Historic Site presents a day of family fun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 22, featuring adventure and hands-on experiences for all ages. Representatives from a dozen central Texas state parks and state natural areas will be on hand to showcase the area’s rich natural and cultural resources. Learn More
Success Stories of Trails in Texas
The National Park Service, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program is working on trail projects throughout Texas including urban trails in Austin and San Antonio and the Llano River Biodiversity trail at Texas Tech University in Junction. Learn More  
TWDB solicits public comments
Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) is hosting a discussion about the implementation of historic legislation creating the State Water Implementation Fund for Texas (SWIFT). This discussion is the third of several meetings that TWDB is hosting related to prospective rulemaking for House Bill 4, 83rd Texas Legislature. Learn More
Globe At Night – Get Out and Observe the Night Sky!
The Globe at Night program is an international citizen-science campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by inviting citizen-scientists to measure their night sky brightness and submit their observations to a website from a computer or smart phone. This hands-on learning activity is designed for schools, students, communities and families. The more participation we inspire in the Hill Country the better data we’ll have for our region. It’s easy, learn more at www.globeatnight.org

Water Blues
“How much IS too much?” Is the rate of growth northwest of San Antonio undermining the good efforts of land conservation investment over the aquifer recharge area? These tough questions are explored in the new documentary film project, Water Blues. View clips by location or issue and pass along to others.

Hill Country Land Trust Acquires 685 Acre Easement in Gillespie County
“A wonderful diversity of native plants is found on this property, and many years of excellent wildlife and range management by the owners is evident,” says HCLT President, Katherine Peake. “But even more exciting to us is that this property contains habitat of the Golden-cheeked Warbler. We consider this easement one of HCLT’s crown jewels.” Read More
For Central Texas Educators: Groundwater to the Gulf
Every year, water experts from over 13 agencies in Central Texas combine forces to take 50 teachers to the aquatic hotspots in and around Austin. We go caving, canoeing, hiking, and splash in streams--all in the name of science. It is the most fun, free way to earn 22 continuing education credits. Dip your hands into local water topics and try activities that help bring those topics back to your classroom. Visit the Groundwater to the Gulf Registration page for more details including photos from years past, registration link, and sponsor info. Learn More

Early Voting Begins Today
Early voting for the March Primary begins today (February 18th) and extends through Friday, February 28th.  Election Day is Tuesday March 4th.  Learn about your local ballot and vote for those who support your Hill Country conservation values.

Upcoming Events
February
February 14 & 21 - San Antonio Environmental Challenges: "Opportunities in Resiliency" - Two-Day Conference - Details

February 21 in San Antonio - City Forum, "Careers in Planning: Insights from CRP Alumni" - Details
February 22 in Stonewall - Outdoor Adventure Showcase at LBJ State Park - Details
February 25 in San Marcos - Central Texas Water Conservation Symposium - "Keeping Your Head Above Water: Maximizing Alternate Water Sources" - Details
February 26-28 in Austin - 2014 Texas Land Conservation Conference - Details
March

March 1 - HCA Photo Contest Begins!

March 1-2 in Bastrop - Texas Audubon Chapter Assembly, featuring Andy Sansom - Details

March 7 in Fredericksburg - 2014 New Landowner Series: "Introduction, Neighbor Relations, Tax Valuations, Well and Septic Permits, Grazing and Hunting Leases" - Presented by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service - Details
March 17-23 - National Wildlife Week! "Wildlife and Water: From the Mountains to the Rivers to the Oceans" - National Wildlife Week gives families, educators and community groups the chance to connect kids with wildlife and explore the world around them - Details

March 21-22 in Bandera - First event in the Bandera County Water Awareness Series - Workshop free and open to the public - Details
Posted: February 19, 2014 9:26   Go to blog

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Wimberley Valley Watershed Association   
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Wimberley, TX 78676
512 722-3390   mail@wimberleywatershed.org

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