The Water Protectors Fund protects our aquifers, springs, creeks, rivers – and the sole source of drinking water for thousands of people by financing critical science, education, advocacy, and legal initiatives in the Hill Country.  Click the banner to find out more and get involved.

The Wimberley Valley Watershed Association is a non-profit organization located in the heart of the Texas Hill Country, born out of a love for water.

WVWA has been working since 1996 to keep Jacob’s Well, the headwaters of Cypress Creek, clean, clear, and flowing for generations to come.

Our vision is to create a greater understanding community-wide of the many benefits that flow from a respectful relationship with the land: human health, ecological health, economic sustainability, enriched community life, and the renewal of the human spirit.

Events

Mon 18
Wed 20

Drug Take Back

October 20 @ 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Thu 21

Imagine a Day Without Water

October 21 - October 22
Nov 14

Two-Step for Karst Barn Dance

November 14 @ 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm

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Bring your unused or expired medication for safe disposal through the Drug Take Back program–right here in Wimberley! Thanks to Keep Wimberley Beautiful, the City of Wimberley, and Hays County Texas - Official for hosting the event at the Wimberley Community Center on Wednesday, Oct. 20 between 10am and 2pm.Safe disposal of medicines helps keep these emerging contaminants out of our aquifers, springs, and rivers. Help protect water supplies and aquatic habitat by bringing old/unused medicines to the Drug Take Back or call your local pharmacy to see if they have a drug disposal kiosk at their location. Hint: The Walgreens at William Cannon and Escarpment has one. ... See MoreSee Less
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3 days ago

Wimberley Valley Watershed Association
Ahhhh, recharge like this makes everyone happy! WVWA's Coleman's Canyon Preserve protects part of the sensitive recharge zone for Jacob's Well . Remember all that runoff from the 5-7" of rain earlier this week? THIS is good recharge for our groundwater supplies.Find out more about Coleman's Canyon, the Hays County POSAC Jacob's Well Expansion Project, and Connectivity Projects at: wimberleywatershed.org/impactareas/landconservation/colemans-canyon-preserve/ ... See MoreSee Less
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Nearly 7 inches of rain in downtown Wimberley overnight! The rainfall created lots of runoff. Dry Cypress Creek upstream of Jacob's Well is flowing. Combined Dry Cypress and Jacob's Well flow went from under 3 cubic feet per second (cfs) to over 300 cfs. On the Blanco, the gauge at Fischer Store Rd usually measures baseflow from Pleasant Valley and Park Springs, but with intense runoff the Blanco combined flows went from about 16 cfs to a peak flow of 9,110 cfs.We're seeing streamflow decline now that rain has stopped. Keep your eyes on the skies and watch out for flooded roadways. This is good recharge for groundwater supplies, but such intense rain can also create dangerous conditions. Stay safe! ... See MoreSee Less
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Y'all be safe out there. There's a Flash Flood Watch till tomorrow morning. Check low water crossings on ATX Floods (many counties) or the Hays Co Road Status before you head out tomorrow morning. Links to those two interactive maps plus much more: wimberleywatershed.org/impactareas/watershedprotection/water-monitoring/#Maps ... See MoreSee Less
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With last night's almost 5" rain at Jacob's Well, Dry Cypress Creek isn't dry! The boil from Jacob's Well spring is seen here to the right and the Dry Cypress Creek flow is to the left.

Nearly 7 inches of rain in downtown Wimberley overnight! The rainfall created lots of runoff. Dry Cypress Creek upstream of Jacob's Well is flowing. Combined Dry Cypress and Jacob's Well flow went from under 3 cubic feet per second (cfs) to over 300 cfs.

Even with 3-4" of rain in the last week, area Middle Trinity springs have almost returned pre-rain flow conditions. https://wimberleywatershed.org/impactareas/watershedprotection/water-monitoring/

Calling all artists! Elevate your art in the Sacred Springs Kite Exhibit... check this out!Every year, American Kitefliers Association selects a Grand National Champion. The winning kites are selected for their beauty, function, and creativity. Art4Water and Sky Wind World, Inc are hosting the Sacred Springs Kite Exhibition to elevate awareness of Texas' springs. Artists can submit original artwork through the link below. Selected artwork will be turned into kites to be flown and displayed at Austin Public Library Central Campus in 2022. We hope the AKA Grand National Champion examples inspire art submissions!Visit wimberleywatershed.org/impactareas/art4water/ for project details, commission stipend, format, and entry requirements. Art submissions due by August 1, 2021. Water creates the most magical parts of our world. This is especially true for the Hill Country. We are seeking art that captures that magic. The art should be focused on water in all its forms and the life that springs from it and the efforts to preserve it. #CallForEntry #TexasWater #ValueWater #kite ... See MoreSee Less
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HB 4146 (by T. King), if passed, would prohibit wastewater discharge into our most pristine rivers and creeks across Texas, including those that recharge the Edwards Aquifer. The bill is set for a hearing with the House Environmental Regulations Committee today, April 12th at 2:00 PM Please register your support for HB 4146 by clicking the link below. A simple “I support passage of HB 4146” in the comment section provided is enough and only takes a minute. We hope you will take the time to do so by Monday afternoon. Go to: comments.house.texas.gov/home?c=c260 then select "HB 4146 by King, Tracy O." to submit your online comment.Pristine waters--including many headwaters of Hill Country streams and rivers--deserve special protections. There are not many pristine waters left. Rep. Tracy King has been tapped as chair of House Natural Resources and is carrying several consequential bills, including the sweeping HB 4146 (SB 1747 Zaffirini) “Pristine Waters,” which identifies stream segments statewide that run clean and clear, and prohibit the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality from authorizing direct discharge of waste or pollutants into them. An estimated 2,000 miles across 44 stream segments would be protected, including the prized waters of the Texas Hill Country, among them Cypress Creek and the Blanco River. A hearing is Monday, Apr. 12 before the Environmental Regulation Committee. This one deserves special treatment--please consider submitting online comments in favor of this bill before or during the hearing. Here are lege details and how to submit comments: wimberleywatershed.org/2021/04/10/speak-for-water-at-the-capitol/#Waters ... See MoreSee Less
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